Promoting Decent Work For Homeworkers In Global Garment And Textile Supply Chains

Promoting Decent Work For Homeworkers In Global Garment And Textile Supply Chains

“Who made my clothes” is a question increasingly asked by consumers, especially after the spate of serious industrial accidents killing thousands of workers, many of them in the garment districts of Bangladesh (famously, Tazreen and Rana Plaza). Shareholders, investors and large investment funds are also judging companies not only on the basis of profits but also social accountability.

The garment and textile sector is a key sector for homeworkers, but many global supply chain companies fear the code compliance risks associated with homework and often impose antihomeworker policies.

The primary aims of this paper are to examine the implications and impact of corporate codes of conduct of major international brands in global garment and textile supply chains on the fair and decent treatment of homeworkers and to identify corporate and non-corporate measures that can more effectively promote labour standards and rights that take into account the particularities of homework.